Foiling Designs

In this technological age, we all labor under a heavy burden of information overload. If you’re like me, and have given up on the habitual reading of the news, then your burden is a little lighter than it was before. (I don’t watch TV anyhow, so I just read news online before, or occasionally in an old-fashioned newspaper.) But even still, we all know an awful lot about what is happening, well beyond the confines of our communities, our families, and our personal lives.

Among the things that we can do with all this information is to let it get to us. In other words, we worry. What is becoming of our world? What is becoming of our youth? Will we ever see peace? Will so-and-so ever come home from the war? Is God involved in the this mess, or has he given up on us? Etc. etc. etc.

The responsorial psalm of today’s Mass gives us a dose of salutary truth for our evening reflection:

The Lord brings to nought the plans of nations;
he foils the designs of peoples.
But the plan of the Lord stands forever;
the design of his heart, through all generations.

However crazy things in the world might be, God is still in control. He is the Lord of history. He is not only bigger than our current problems, he is bigger than all of history combined. He embraces it all. And, somehow, he is working through what is happening, even if we don’t see it now. There will come a time when we will see God’s triumph perfectly.

The plan of the Lord stands forever – commend yourself and our world to him each day. As we said in our psalm response today at Holy Mass, “Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you”.

King of Kings and Lord of Lords

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2 Responses to Foiling Designs

  1. Rob Kuehn says:

    Nice. When I worry about the state of humanity, I always come back to the realization that God is indeed in charge.

    Good to see you on Sunday. I finish up my consulting gig and head home to IN 23 July. I am so ready!

    Do you go back to Rome for your studies after Mexico. If so how many more years there?

    Cheers Rob

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