Feast of St. Monica

Today’s feast day is a favorite for many, since mothers throughout the world pray for the conversion of their children as St. Monica did. St. Monica, pray for us all!

Following the photo below is a passage about her final days from the famous book (and the world’s first autobiography), the Confessions, written by her son, St. Augustine.

I took this photo of her tomb last year; it is located in a chapel within the Basilica of St. Augustine, just behind my school here in Rome. Since tomorrow is the Feast of St. Augustine, I will go there then and pay a visit to her tomb. Will pray for you all there.

Note the Latin inscription at the base of the tomb, which says, “St. Monica, pray for us.”

This reading is the second lesson from the Office of Readings (from the Liturgy of the Hours or “Breviary”, the daily prayer said by priests, religious, and others) for this feast. I look forward to re-reading it each year.

The day was now approaching when my mother Monica would depart from this life; you knew that day, Lord, though we did not. She and I happened to be standing by ourselves at a window that overlooked the garden in the courtyard of the house. At the time we were in Ostia on the Tiber. We had gone there after a long and wearisome journey to get away from the noisy crowd, and to rest and prepare for our sea voyage. I believe that you, Lord, caused all this to happen in your own mysterious ways. And so the two of us, all alone, were enjoying a very pleasant conversation, forgetting the past and pushing on to what is ahead. We were asking one another in the presence of the Truth – for you are the Truth – what it would be like to share the eternal life enjoyed by the saints, which eye has not seen, nor ear heard, which has not even entered into the heart of man. We desired with all our hearts to drink from the streams of your heavenly fountain, the fountain of life.

That was the substance of our talk, though not the exact words. But you know, O Lord, that in the course of our conversation that day, the world and its pleasures lost all their attraction for us. My mother said: “Son, as far as I am concerned, nothing in this life now gives me any pleasure. I do not know why I am still here, since I have no further hopes in this world. I did have one reason for wanting to live a little longer: to see you become a Catholic Christian before I died. God has lavished his gifts on me in that respect, for I know that you have even renounced earthly happiness to be his servant. So what am I doing here?”

I do not really remember how I answered her. Shortly, within five days or thereabouts, she fell sick with a fever. Then one day during the course of her illness she became unconscious and for a while she was unaware of her surroundings. My brother and I rushed to her side but she regained consciousness quickly. She looked at us as we stood there and asked in a puzzled voice: “Where was I?”

We were overwhelmed with grief, but she held her gaze steadily upon us and spoke further: “Here you shall bury your mother.” I remained silent as I held back my tears. However, my brother haltingly expressed his hope that she might not die in a strange country but in her own land, since her end would be happier there. When she heard this, her face was filled with anxiety, and she reproached him with a glance because he had entertained such earthly thoughts. Then she looked at me and spoke: “Look what he is saying.” Thereupon she said to both of us: “Bury my body wherever you will; let not care of it cause you any concern. One thing only I ask you, that you remember me at the altar of the Lord wherever you may be.” Once our mother had expressed this desire as best she could, she fell silent as the pain of her illness increased.

Read more about St. Monica here.

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2 Responses to Feast of St. Monica

  1. brandisims says:

    Thanks for your prayers! We still need them.
    I am also praying that our oldest comes back to the Church after realizing that “his own way” isn’t working out!

    Oh, St. Monica, pray for us!

  2. I’ve recently come across some excellent passages in the Catechism regarding the link between the intercession of the Saints and repentance.

    In the communion of saints, “a perennial link of charity exists between the faithful who have already reached their heavenly home, those who are expiating their sins in purgatory and those who are still pilgrims on earth. between them there is, too, an abundant exchange of all good things.” In this wonderful exchange, the holiness of one profits others, well beyond the harm that the sin of one could cause others. Thus recourse to the communion of saints lets the contrite sinner be more promptly and efficaciously purified of the punishments for sin. (CCC 1475)

    This passage cites Pope Paul VI’s Indulgentiarum doctrina.

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