Educators in Prayer

PARENTS: EDUCATORS IN PRAYER

By reason of their dignity and mission, Christian parents have the specific responsibility of educating their children in prayer, introducing them to a gradual discovery of the mystery of God and to a personal dialogue with Him: “It is particularly in the Christian family, enriched by the grace and the office of the sacrament of Matrimony, that from the earliest years children should be taught, according to the faith received in Baptism, to have a knowledge of God, to worship Him, and to love their neighbor.”

The concrete example and living witness of parents is fundamental and irreplaceable in educating their children to pray. Only by praying together with their children can a father and mother – exercising their royal priesthood – penetrate the innermost depths of their children’s hearts and leave an impression that the future events in their lives will not be able to efface.

Let us again listen to the appeal made by Paul VI to parents: “Mothers, do you teach your children the Christian prayers? Do you prepare them, in conjunction with the priests, for the sacraments that they receive when they are young: Confession, Communion and Confirmation? Do you encourage them when they are sick to think of Christ suffering? To invoke the aid of the Blessed Virgin and the saints? Do you say the family rosary together? And you, fathers, do you pray with your children, with the whole domestic community, at least sometimes? Your example of honesty in thought and action, joined to some common prayer, is a lesson for life, an act of worship of singular value. In this way you bring peace to your homes: Pax huic domui. Remember, it is thus that you build up the Church.”

— Pope John Paul II, Familiaris Consortio, 60

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One Response to Educators in Prayer

  1. hashtagcatholic says:

    Having been raised by atheists (at the time) and agnostics (at the time) I’m not sure why I was ever taught the “Now I lay me down to sleep” prayer. It certainly never went past learning the words. I never understood why I should say that prayer. Well, then when I was older, my stepdad taught us, “Good food, good meat…” Again, not sure why.

    Went to breakfast with some ladies from the gym last weekend, one of whom grew up Catholic but attends services elsewhere now. I glanced over at her when when we bowed our heads to pray and she said, “We can say ‘Bless us, O Lord…” Wow. That meant a lot! And I KNOW that prayer!

    Oh how I wish I knew all the Christian prayers by heart, in my heart, the way I know those. I’d say that parents, even if they don’t know them by heart, should teach them so their children will.

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