Holy Cards

I’ve always enjoyed collecting holy cards, particularly the older ones that one occasionally finds with unique and beautiful images and prayers or quotations on them. I remember that when I used to go to the local adoration chapel to pray early in my time here in Birmingham (before entering the seminary, etc.), there was a box where people would leave pious articles and I would rummage through it to find old holy cards – several of which I still have in my breviary.

One of the traditions that I’ve started at my parishes is that of having a commemorative holy card on two occasions each year – on a feast of Our Lady and on a feast of Our Lord. So far, since my arrival in July 2014, we’ve had three: the Feast of the Assumption in 2014, the Feast of Easter this year, and now, the Immaculate Conception. (The next one I think will be on Palm Sunday, but we’ll see!) Here’s a photo of the Immaculate Conception card:

I love the image of Our Lady

I love the image of Our Lady

It has a quotation from Pope Benedict on the back (the previous two cards had quotes from Pope Francis). It says:

“Looking at Mary, how can we, her children, fail to let the aspiration to beauty, goodness, and purity of heart be aroused in us? Her heavenly innocence draws us to God, helping us to overcome the temptation to live a mediocre life composed of compromises with evil, and directs us decisively toward the authentic good, which is the source of joy.” (From Dec. 8, 2005)

Of course, I managed to forget to put the cards out for our vigil Mass tonight. There’s always tomorrow, and next weekend! Happy Feast Day, everyone!

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3 Responses to Holy Cards

  1. Deacon Dan says:

    My Art history professor always stressed the traditional iconography. He taught two ways to differentiate an assumption from the Immaculate conception IN IC the madonna is by herself often with hands folded or in prayerful supplication eyes glancing downward. If there are angels of any kind they are more likely to be at the lateral side. The madonna is dressed in white perhaps with a blue mantle.
    In Assumption images the principal colors are red and blue of Mary’s garb. the madonna is either on a cloud or is being lifted by cherubs or hoisted by JC. Her gaze is heavenward.

    For these reasons i identified the hOly card as an assumption.

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